Tournament effect

Nassim Nicholas Taleb writing in his book Black Swan:

Let me start with the economist Sherwin Rosen. In the early 80s, he wrote the papers about “the economics of superstars.” In one of the papers he conveyed his sense of outrage that a basketball player could earn $1.2 million a year, or a television celebrity could make $2 million. To get an idea of how this concentration is increasing – i.e., of how we are moving away from Mediocristan – considerate that television celebrities and sports stars brackets (even in Europe) get contracts today, only two decades later, where in the hundreds of millions of dollars! The extreme is about brackets (so far) 20 times higher than it was two decades ago!

According to Rosen, this inequality comes from a tournament effect: someone who is marginally “better” can easily win the entire pot, leaving the others with nothing. Using an argument from chapter 3 people prefer to pay $10.99 for a recording featuring Horowitz to $9.99 for a struggling pianist. Would you rather read Kundera for $13.99 or some unknown author for $1. So it’s looks like a 20 minutes, where the winner grabs the whole thing – and he does not have to win by much.

Hey. I’m Alex Murrell. I'm a Planner at Epoch Design in Bristol where I help deliver highly creative, innovative and effective pack, instore and online communications for some of the world’s biggest FMCG brands. Want to know more? You can find me on Twitter or LinkedIn.

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